[clug-talk] Enterprise Linux?

Michael Gale michael.gale at bluesuperman.com
Thu Jan 20 22:49:55 PST 2005


Hello,

	This is a question that actually gets asked a lot I find. You heard 
correctly, the chief maintainer as you called him (Patrick Volkerding) 
did suffer a serious health scare a while back (about a month ago) but 
he is all better now.

But even before that when I started converting all the RH servers at 
work to Slackware machines people where saying things like:

"Slackware ? what the hell is that ?"
"Is that a current Linux desktop ?"
"Where are the rpms for "

and the biggest complaint from my boss:

"Where is the X-windows thingy"

But seriously I doubt it's going anywhere soon ... even when Patrick was 
sick there were still people working on the Slackware project and 
waiting his return.

A little history on Slackware straight from the book:

"Slackware was the first Linux distribution to achieve widespread use. 
It was started by Patrick Volkerding in late 1992"

Slackware will be around for a long time, I am sure of that. It has a 
strong following because of the consistency between releases and it's 
stability. Once you tried Slack you will always come back.

But if anything did happen and for some reason Slackware was not 
available, I have learned so much from using Slackware over the years I 
would switch to:

Debian
FreeBSD or OpenBSD

I think we all should try and convert 1 user a week to use Slackware :)

Michael.


Niels Voll wrote:
> An honest question - since I can't profess to be an expert on 
> Slackware:  how comfortable are you (and other Slackware experts) with 
> the distros' survivability, if something should happen to its chief 
> maintainer? From what I had read, there was a recent rather serious 
> health scare (fortunately seems ok now) - so this issue can become very 
> real in a hurry ...
> 
> I'm asking the question, since for an enterprise situation without 
> considerable inhouse expertise, you'd really hate to be stuck with a 
> strategic tool to your infrastructure, if that tool would seriously 
> suffer from the absence of a single individual. Of course, if you have 
> significant inhouse expertise, the hop to a different distro isn't as 
> dramatic as hopping between operating systems or even hopping between 
> various flavours of Unix.
> 
> ...Niels
> 
> 
> Michael Gale wrote:
> 
>> Hello,
>>
>>     I agree with Travis, Debian or Slackware make a enterprise distro. 
>> I my self am a big Slackware fan.
>>
>> Michael.
>>
>>
>> Travis Rousseau wrote:
>>
>>> Ok sorry but the DVD Novell sent me was a dud :( just won't work!
>>>
>>> I would recommend Debian woody or Slackware for enterprise "like" 
>>> situations or where you need low maintenance equipment and want 
>>> stability but dont need really good support (In my opinion google can 
>>> provide some of the best support just by googling the errors)
>>>
>>> I use Suse 9.2 and the like for more desktop situations where 
>>> stability is not as critical (In my opinion)
>>>
>>> Travis R.
>>>
>>> Travis Rousseau wrote:
>>>
>>>> Well for Redhat I have one RHEL3 server and a few RH9 and FC3 
>>>> computers.  From them there is a few main differences the first is 
>>>> support for RHEL Redhat provides support right to you. For FC3 you 
>>>> find what support you can (You'll find it for everything!). The 
>>>> second main difference is your not using release packages (or at 
>>>> least me) with RHEL3 your using old packages with security fixes 
>>>> back ported to older "Known to be fully stable". Now with fedora 
>>>> core you get the packages at release time and they have undergone 
>>>> little if any testing so you do not know how well it will react in 
>>>> the situation it is put in and you must worry about package 
>>>> discrepancys.
>>>>
>>>> I will install a Suse Enterprise server 9 from novell right now and 
>>>> report back the diffrences for suse.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Travis R.
>>>>
>>>> Shawn wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I have a contact who is considering an enterprise Linux solution, 
>>>>> but I don't think he really needs one.  Before I give him my 
>>>>> "formal" opinion, I thought I'd ask what the difference is between 
>>>>> a regular desktop version and the enterprise version of Linux. (say 
>>>>> Suse Pro vs Suse Enterprise)
>>>>>
>>>>> As I understand things (and freely admit I could be wrong), there 
>>>>> is no difference other than the bundled support contract with the 
>>>>> Enterprise edition.  Is this correct?  Or are there other 
>>>>> differences in terms of available packages or the "quality" of the 
>>>>> packages?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks for any input.
>>>>>
>>>>> Shawn
>>>>>
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